China: End Arbitrary Detention in Mental Health Institutions
As China’s first ever Mental Health Law came into force on May 1, 2013, it has major shortcomings including that it does not eliminate the country’s system of involuntary confinement.
The involuntary confinement for people with mental disabilities is devoid of court oversight and falls far short of the requirements of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which China adopted in 2008.
Human rights abuses in mental health institutions in China are extensively documented. Patients are frequently deprived of the right to make decisions regarding treatment and confinement; forced medications and violence are rife. In one widely-publicized case in 2008, an elderly woman involuntarily committed by her family was found beaten to death in a psychiatric hospital in Shandong Province.
China: End Arbitrary Detention in Mental Health Institutions

As China’s first ever Mental Health Law came into force on May 1, 2013, it has major shortcomings including that it does not eliminate the country’s system of involuntary confinement.

The involuntary confinement for people with mental disabilities is devoid of court oversight and falls far short of the requirements of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which China adopted in 2008.

Human rights abuses in mental health institutions in China are extensively documented. Patients are frequently deprived of the right to make decisions regarding treatment and confinement; forced medications and violence are rife. In one widely-publicized case in 2008, an elderly woman involuntarily committed by her family was found beaten to death in a psychiatric hospital in Shandong Province.