latimes:

Six Missouri residents have filed a federal lawsuit alleging excessive force and false arrests by the Ferguson and St. Louis County police departments during the Ferguson protests following the shooting death of Michael Brown. The residents accuse the police of humiliating them and depriving them of their civil rights; their lawsuit seeks millions in damages for alleged abuses that took place between Aug. 11 and 13
Photo: People protest in Ferguson. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

latimes:

Six Missouri residents have filed a federal lawsuit alleging excessive force and false arrests by the Ferguson and St. Louis County police departments during the Ferguson protests following the shooting death of Michael Brown. The residents accuse the police of humiliating them and depriving them of their civil rights; their lawsuit seeks millions in damages for alleged abuses that took place between Aug. 11 and 13

Photo: People protest in Ferguson. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

breakingnews:

United Nations: Syria is biggest humanitarian emergency of our era with three million Syrians now refugees.
Read more here
Photo: Will Wintercross/The Telegraph

breakingnews:

United Nations: Syria is biggest humanitarian emergency of our era with three million Syrians now refugees.

Read more here

Photo: Will Wintercross/The Telegraph

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
Representatives for two rebel groups in Mali agreed to end hostilities and join together for peace talks with the government next month.
Riek Machar’s rebel group in South Sudan have rejected a power-sharing deal.
Vice reports on weapons moving into South Sudan.
17 were killed in in-fighting among factions of the Seleka rebel group in the Central African Republic.
Abdullah al-Thinni has resigned as Libya’s prime minister in an attempt to end a power struggle. 
Egypt and the UAE have secretly carried out airstrikes in Libya.
An indefinite ceasefire was brokered between Israel and Gaza.
Scenes from on the ground in Gaza and Israel — captured by photographers Paolo Pellegrin and Peter van Agtmael.
The UN says that 3 million people have fled Syria in the current conflict, and another 6.5 million have been internally displaced.
American journalist Peter Theo Curtis, who has published under the name Theo Padnos, was released from captivity in Syria this week. He was held by the Nusra Front.
His release was secured with the help of Qatar, who are continuing to try to negotiate the release of other Western hostages — one of whom is now known to be an American aid worker held by ISIS.
Steve Coll on the kidnapping of journalists.
ISIS captives, including James Foley, were waterboarded.
Evan Hill remembers his correspondence with Foley.
The mother of captive journalist Steven Sotloff has released a video plea to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi for her son’s freedom.
Ben Hubbard and Eric Schmitt report on ISIS’s management and organizational structure.
One piece of reporting indicates that there is support among non-extremist rebels in Syria for US action against ISIS, saying that ISIS has “ravaged” Syria and hijacked their revolution.
Public beheadings have become a “common spectacle" in Syria, according to the UN.
Two journalists acquired an ISIS laptop — full of “how-tos” for weaponizing the bubonic plague, among other things.
A 33-year-old US citizen — Douglas McCain — was killed fighting for ISIS in Syria. US intelligence has reportedly identified almost a dozen Americans who have similarly traveled abroad to join ISIS.
43 UN peacekeepers are being held by an armed group in Syrian Golan Heights.
Mapping ISIS’ development and expansion in Syria and Iraq.
In Iraq, ISIS is accused of ethnic cleansing in a prison massacre in Mosul where 670 Shia prisoners were reportedly killed.
US airstrikes in Iraq, day by day.
Armed Yemeni rebels staged sit ins this week outside the capital city, Sanaa, protesting the government.
An ongoing, bloody Taliban offensive in southern Afghanistan has killed as many as 900 in some of the “worst fighting” in years.
Afghanistan’s disputed presidential election is costing the country ‘s economy $5bn. 
PM Sharif has been named by Pakistani police as a murder suspect in the deaths of 14 protesters near Lahore in June.
Thousands of Pakistani demonstrators, lead by Tahir ul-Qadri and Imran Khan, have camped out in front of parliament in Islamabad since mid-August demanding Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif step down. Pakistan’s army chief has now been named mediator in the crisis.
Russia has opened up a new offensive in Ukraine and NATO has accused Russia of “blatant violation" of Ukrainian sovereignty.
Ukrainian soldiers coming out of Novoazovsk say they were “cannon fodder" for Russian tanks.
Ukraine’s prime minister announced the country’s renewed intentions to join NATO.
In photos: what remains of Donetsk.
The debate over Russia’s invasion/incursion plays out, of course, on Twitter.
Obama announced executive actions to benefit veterans, soldiers and military families.
The prosecution rests in the Blackwater trial.
Photo: Donetsk, Ukraine. A damaged and bloody kitchen in downtown Donetsk. Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: Donetsk, Ukraine. A damaged and bloody kitchen in downtown Donetsk. Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA.

Things to get excited about:
- It’s Friday, which means,
- … weekend is around the corner, which also means,
- … it’s a long weekend
Happy end of the week, Tumblr. 

Things to get excited about:

- It’s Friday, which means,

- … weekend is around the corner, which also means,

- … it’s a long weekend

Happy end of the week, Tumblr. 

npr:

NPR’s Michel Martin was invited by St. Louis Public Radio to moderate an intensely emotional community conversation around race, police tactics and leadership.

Rev. Willis Johnson, the pastor of Wellspring Church, hosted a community conversation Thursday night that drew about 200 people to the church. In welcoming the audience, Johnson acknowledged he’s “gone from feeling hurt, to wanting to hurt,” but he said he hoped the event would be a step to healing a “community in trauma.”

Plea To Ferguson’s Leaders: To Help Heal, Acknowledge Our Hurt

Photo credit: Whitney Curtis for NPR

"It’s kind of heartbreaking because how do you explain to a five-year-old that he is being turned away because of what he believes in, because of his religion, because of what’s part of him. How do you explain that to him?"

A Navajo kindergartner was sent home from school over his religious hair  (via micdotcom)

(via randomactsofchaos)

"

Accident seemed like an odd word to me for this situation. When I hear the word “accident”, I usually think about spilled milk or the dog urinating on the carpet or even bumper scratch. Accidents were things that you respond to with, “Whoops, sorry!” But with this accident, I wondered: to whom could we even say “sorry” now that a man lay dead?

While I watched, I kept thinking about why these accidents always seemed to happen to black people. And why they were called accidents, when it seemed so clearly to be much more than an accident – when it seemed to be a flaw in a system that called things accidents.

"

I’m black, my brother’s white … and he’s a cop who shot a black man on duty

huffingtonpost:

Jon Stewart’s Priceless Response To Fox News On Ferguson

Jon Stewart is back from vacation, and he’s not wasting any time going after one of his favorite targets: Fox News.

Watch his the full brilliant 10  minute monologue on racism and Ferguson  here. 

reportagebygettyimages:

'Racism has long been part of American history. Undeniably powerful and disturbing images of swastikas, Klansmen and flaming crosses are immensely associated with the term. Since the civil-rights movement of the ’50s and ’60s, many people prefer to believe racism no longer exists. Yet, it is still alive and functioning in this country. Today, with the goal of becoming part of the American mainstream, the racist movement operates through both subtle and transparent practices to recruit new believers from among America's youth.'

-David S. Holloway, who won a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2005 for his project documenting white nationalism in the US.

2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

Read more.

"The first day when I was cleaning the latrines and the drain, my foot slipped and my leg sank in the excrement up to my calf. I screamed and ran away. Then I came home and cried and cried. I knew there was only this work for me."

— Sona, Bharatpur city, Rajasthan, June 2013

The Indian government should end “manual scavenging” – the cleaning of human waste by communities considered low-caste – by ensuring that local officials enforce the laws prohibiting this discriminatory practice. The government should implement existing legislation aimed to assist manual scavenging community members find alternative, sustainable livelihoods.

Across India, castes that work as “manual scavengers” collect human excrement on a daily basis, and carry it away in cane baskets for disposal. Women from this caste usually clean dry toilets in homes, while men do the more physically demanding cleaning of sewers and septic tanks. The report describes the barriers people face in leaving manual scavenging, including threats of violence and eviction from local residents but also threats, harassment, and unlawful withholding of wages by local officials.