micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices

(via dannielle)


Kenya: Killings, Disappearances by Anti-Terror Police
There is strong evidence that Kenya’s Anti-Terrorism Police Unit (ATPU) has carried out a series of extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances. Human Rights Watch also found evidence of arbitrary arrests and mistreatment of terrorism suspects in detention.Kenyan authorities should urgently investigate alleged killings, disappearances, and other abuses by the unit and hold those responsible to account. International donors should suspend support to the unit and other security forces responsible for human rights violations.Kenyan counterterrorism forces appear to be killing and disappearing people right under the noses of top government officials, major embassies, and the United Nations. This horrendous conduct does not protect Kenyans from terrorism – it simply undermines the rule of law.In research conducted in Kenya between November 2013 and June 2014, Human Rights Watch documented at least 10 cases of killings, 10 cases of enforced disappearances, and 11 cases of mistreatment or harassment of terrorism suspects in which there is strong evidence of the counterterrorism unit’s involvement, mainly in Nairobi since 2011.
Photo: Kenya’s General Service Unit (GSU) policemen watch over youths protesting the killing of Muslim cleric Aboud Rogo Mohammed in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa, August 31, 2012. © 2012 Reuters
Kenya: Killings, Disappearances by Anti-Terror Police

There is strong evidence that Kenya’s Anti-Terrorism Police Unit (ATPU) has carried out a series of extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances. Human Rights Watch also found evidence of arbitrary arrests and mistreatment of terrorism suspects in detention.

Kenyan authorities should urgently investigate alleged killings, disappearances, and other abuses by the unit and hold those responsible to account. International donors should suspend support to the unit and other security forces responsible for human rights violations.

Kenyan counterterrorism forces appear to be killing and disappearing people right under the noses of top government officials, major embassies, and the United Nations. This horrendous conduct does not protect Kenyans from terrorism – it simply undermines the rule of law.

In research conducted in Kenya between November 2013 and June 2014, Human Rights Watch documented at least 10 cases of killings, 10 cases of enforced disappearances, and 11 cases of mistreatment or harassment of terrorism suspects in which there is strong evidence of the counterterrorism unit’s involvement, mainly in Nairobi since 2011.

Photo: Kenya’s General Service Unit (GSU) policemen watch over youths protesting the killing of Muslim cleric Aboud Rogo Mohammed in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa, August 31, 2012. © 2012 Reuters

Spain: Halt Summary Pushbacks to Morocco

Spain should immediately halt summary returns of migrants to Morocco from its North African enclave, Melilla. Spain should also investigate evidence that Guardia Civil officers beat migrants at the border fence.

Spain’s right to secure its borders doesn’t give it carte blanche to abuse migrants. The government in Madrid and local authorities in Melilla need to stop these illegal pushbacks and take action against any Guardia Civil officers who use excessive force against migrants.

During the week of August 11, 2014, large groups of migrants from unidentified sub-Saharan African countries attempted to scale the six-meter-high triple fence that separates Morocco and Melilla. Media reports, citing Spanish local authorities in Melilla, indicate that approximately 700 people attempted to cross into the enclave on August 12, and 600 on August 13.

Read more. 

cartoonpolitics:

"Unarmed African-American men are shot and killed by police at an alarming rate. This pattern must stop" .. (Jeffrey Mittman, ACLU) .. (more here)

cartoonpolitics:

"Unarmed African-American men are shot and killed by police at an alarming rate. This pattern must stop" .. (Jeffrey Mittman, ACLU) .. (more here)

(Source: robrogers.com, via the-uncensored-she)

huffingtonpost:

Hedy Epstein, 90-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor, Arrested During Michael Brown Protest
Hedy Epstein, a 90-year-old Holocaust survivor, was arrested on Monday during unrest over the death of Michael Brown,KMOV reports.
For more on Epstein’s arrest go here. 

huffingtonpost:

Hedy Epstein, 90-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor, Arrested During Michael Brown Protest

Hedy Epstein, a 90-year-old Holocaust survivor, was arrested on Monday during unrest over the death of Michael Brown,KMOV reports.

For more on Epstein’s arrest go here. 

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.

(via randomactsofchaos)

guardian:

Ferguson: Police arrested 31 as they clashed with protesters in another night of gunfire, teargas and chaos in Ferguson 10 days after the shooting of an unarmed teenager ignited an uproar over race in America.

• Read the latest report from Ferguson 

(Source: theguardian.com)

liberalsarecool:

Police reform now. Intimidation and instigation are not perks of the job.

liberalsarecool:

Police reform now. Intimidation and instigation are not perks of the job.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

hipsterlibertarian:

New from me at The Week today:

This interactive map created by Washington Post journalist Radley Balko and the libertarian Cato Institute shows botched paramilitary police raids across the U.S. The map focuses on the use of heavily armed SWAT teams who use forced entry to storm homes unannounced, usually while inhabitants are sleeping. As many as 40,000 of these raids happen each year — most frequently as police become soldiers in the drug war, often against nonviolent offenders. Many end up targeting innocent civilians by accident. Family pets are frequent targets as well; by one estimate, police in the U.S. kill a pet, on average, every 98 minutes.

Click the image below for the full interactive version at Cato.

(Cato.org)

Unfortunately, the map is far from complete, as it is notoriously difficult to find large-scale data about police brutality. There are no national statistics on police shootings, for instance, though they occur on a regular basis. Since Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson on Aug. 9, police have killed unarmed civilians in Los AngelesSan JoseVictorville, California, and South Salt Lake, Utah.

 - - Bonnie Kristian



Tell the EPA to Protect Kids from Pesticides
“My head started hurting really bad, and I started seeing like all black.” It was mid-afternoon on a scorching summer day in eastern North Carolina when “Jimena,” a 14-year-old farmworker, walked into a tobacco field where she had been sent to work. No one told her that the field had been sprayed with pesticides just hours earlier. “I got really dizzy,” she said, “and I started throwing up.” She told me she was sick for two weeks.
Last summer, while I was investigating child labor on tobacco farms in the United States, I met dozens of children with similar stories. Of the 141 children my colleagues and I interviewed, half reported seeing tractors spraying pesticides in fields where they worked or in nearby fields. The kids said they could smell and feel the chemical spray as it drifted toward them. Many of them said they got sick afterward, with searing headaches, vomiting, shortness of breath, and skin rashes. What they didn’t know was that pesticide exposure can have serious long-term health effects, especially for kids.
US government action to protect child farmworkers is long overdue. But for the first time in 20 years, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to update the regulations designed to protect farmworkers from pesticide exposure.
The proposed changes include many important protections—common sense measures such as requiring pesticide safety training for workers every year, rather than once every five years. And for the first time, the EPA has proposed setting a minimum age for two of the tasks that carry the highest risk of exposure to pesticides: applying them and “early entry work” in fields where pesticides have been sprayed and entry is restricted.
The problem? The EPA proposed setting the minimum age at just 16. If these regulations are adopted, children who are too young to legally buy alcohol or cigarettes will legally be able to spray highly toxic chemicals on US farms.
Read more.
Photo: A 16-year-old worker harvests tobacco on a farm in Kentucky. © 2013 Marcus Bleasdale/VII for Human Rights Watch
Tell the EPA to Protect Kids from Pesticides

“My head started hurting really bad, and I started seeing like all black.” It was mid-afternoon on a scorching summer day in eastern North Carolina when “Jimena,” a 14-year-old farmworker, walked into a tobacco field where she had been sent to work. No one told her that the field had been sprayed with pesticides just hours earlier. “I got really dizzy,” she said, “and I started throwing up.” She told me she was sick for two weeks.

Last summer, while I was investigating child labor on tobacco farms in the United States, I met dozens of children with similar stories. Of the 141 children my colleagues and I interviewed, half reported seeing tractors spraying pesticides in fields where they worked or in nearby fields. The kids said they could smell and feel the chemical spray as it drifted toward them. Many of them said they got sick afterward, with searing headaches, vomiting, shortness of breath, and skin rashes. What they didn’t know was that pesticide exposure can have serious long-term health effects, especially for kids.

US government action to protect child farmworkers is long overdue. But for the first time in 20 years, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to update the regulations designed to protect farmworkers from pesticide exposure.

The proposed changes include many important protections—common sense measures such as requiring pesticide safety training for workers every year, rather than once every five years. And for the first time, the EPA has proposed setting a minimum age for two of the tasks that carry the highest risk of exposure to pesticides: applying them and “early entry work” in fields where pesticides have been sprayed and entry is restricted.

The problem? The EPA proposed setting the minimum age at just 16. If these regulations are adopted, children who are too young to legally buy alcohol or cigarettes will legally be able to spray highly toxic chemicals on US farms.

Read more.

Photo: A 16-year-old worker harvests tobacco on a farm in Kentucky. © 2013 Marcus Bleasdale/VII for Human Rights Watch